49 Years a Trapper: Childhood Hobby Became a Man's Lifelong Passion, for Reporting Texas, republished in The Austin American-Statesman
"Dan Hepker drives deep into a tangle of yaupon and six-year-old pine saplings on a 900-acre ranch on the edge of town. Metal stakes and traps rattle in a box in the truck bed, alongside a trowel, mallet and a collection of glass vials containing odorous lures made from the glands of coyotes, bobcats, foxes and other fur-bearers, and a .22-caliber revolver."

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Ecologist Challenges the Myths About Cedar, Texas’ Most Hated Tree, for Reporting Texas, republished in The Austin American-Statesman
"To be clear, McGreevy does not intend to push a tree-hugging, Greenpeace agenda onto private-property-rights-protecting Texans. Rather, she aims to deconstruct our hate for the cedar and, in doing so, deconstruct how Texans interact with the natural world around them. There are times to cut cedar, she asserts, and times to let it grow, even when it does give us an allergic reaction two months out of the year."

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Rancher Takes an Unconventional Path to Restoring His Land, for Reporting Texas
"Deep in far West Texas, the front-deck lights of an old ranch house shine into the desert night. Inside, Christopher Gill is drinking a Vienna-style Dos Equis after unpacking his bags from a Southwest Airlines flight he makes every other week between his home in San Antonio and El Paso. From there, it’s a two-hour drive to his home in the Sierra Diablo mountains."

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Reforestation Experts Help Restore a Wild Blanco River, for Reporting Texas, republished in The Austin American-Statesman
"The infamous Memorial Day weekend flood of 2015 changed Wimberley and its people. Hundreds of homes were destroyed. Twelve people lost their lives. The river seemed to betray those who populated its cypress-shaded banks, which also changed. The flood deforested much of the riverside — uprooting iconic bald cypresses, pecans, sycamores and leaving behind mangled earth and debris. In a single night, it seemed that the ideal Hill Country riverside house with its shaded and manicured riverbank had met its match: a riparian environment in flux."

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In Harvey’s Wake, Evacuees Mourn Their Losses and Worry About Their Future, for Reporting Texas
'"I’ve got a little old $10,000, fifth-wheel, Whoop-de-damn-do. But for those people with a $275,000 house, with all their belongings and everything else in there, and all of a sudden, poof.”' [Meier] shook his head. 'That’s a hell of a lifestyle change.'"

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